The evolution of the modern day calendar

During the Republic, they also cited years using the names of reigning consuls, and of course in the Imperial period, they often used Roman emperors, for instance, an historian might say, during the reign of Tiberius, such and such occurred. Plutarch, writing in The Life of Numa Pompilius, explains how the calendar had fallen into complete disarray, to be reformed by Pompilius. I quote Plutarch at length due to the richness of the passage.

The evolution of the modern day calendar

During the Republic, they also cited years using the names of reigning consuls, and of course in the Imperial period, they often used Roman emperors, for instance, an historian might say, during the reign of Tiberius, such and such occurred.

Plutarch, writing in The Life of Numa Pompilius, explains how the calendar had fallen into complete disarray, to be reformed by Pompilius.

I quote Plutarch at length due to the richness of the passage.

Ancient Roman History Timeline

During the reign of Romulus, they had let their months run on without any certain or equal term; some of them contained twenty days, others thirty-five, others more; they had no sort of knowledge of the inequality in the motions of the sun and moon; they only kept to the one rule that the whole course of the year contained three hundred and sixty days.

Numa, calculating the difference between the lunar and the solar year at eleven days, for that the moon completed her anniversary course in three hundred and fifty-four days, and the sun in three hundred and sixty-five, to remedy this incongruity doubled the eleven days, and every other year added an intercalary month, to follow February, consisting of twenty-two days, and called by the The evolution of the modern day calendar the month Mercedinus.

This amendment, however, itself, in course of time, came to need other amendments. He also altered the order of the months; for March, which was reckoned the first he put into the third place; and January, which was the eleventh, he made the first; and February, which was the twelfth and last, the second.

Many will have it, that it was Numa, also, who added the two months of January and February But others, because of its being p and not ph, will not allow of the derivation of this word from Aphrodite, but say it is called April from aperio, Latin for to open, because that this month is high spring, and opens and discloses the buds and flowers.

The next is called May, from Maia, the mother of Mercury, to whom it is sacred; then June follows, so called from Juno; some, however, derive them from the two ages, old and young, majores, being their name for older, and juniores for younger men.

The Evolution of the Modern Day Calendar

To the other months they gave denominations according to their order; so the fifth was called Quintilis, Sextilis the sixth, and the rest, September, October, November, and December. Afterwards Quintilis received the name of Julius, from Caesar, who defeated Pompey; as also Sextilis that of Augustus, from the second Caesar, who had that title.

Domitian, also, in imitation, gave the two other following months his own names, of Germanicus and Domitianus; but, on his being slain, they recovered their ancient denominations of September and October.

The evolution of the modern day calendar

The two last are the only ones that have kept their names throughout without any alteration. Of the months which were added or transposed in their order by Numa, February comes from februa; and is as much a Purification month; in it they make offerings to the dead, and celebrate the Lupercalia, which, in most points, resembles a purification.

January was also called from janus, and precedence given to it by Numa before March, which was dedicated to the god Mars; because, as I conceive, he wished to take every opportunity of intimating that the arts and studies of peace are to be preferred before those of war.

Archeological remains reveal that Romans often painted the calendar on the walls of their homes. Archeological remains of Roman calendar fragment The month was divided into the Kalends, the first day of the month, the Nones, which was the 9th day before the Ides counting Idus itself as the 1st dayand the Ides, which was the 13th day of January, February, April, June, August, September, November, and December, or the 15th day of March, May, July, or October.

Other days were counted in relation to these three points. It is presumed that the early Roman calendar was influenced by the Babylonians, and this is also true of the days of the week.

The names of the days of the week were derived from the heavenly bodies which were known to the ancients, namely, the Sun, Moon, Mars, Mercury, Jupiter, Venus, and Saturn.

The names of heavenly bodies were also used as deities. During the Medieval Period, similar Norse equivalents replaced some of the Roman gods. Tuesday comes from Tiu, the Norse god of war. The supreme deity Woden names Wednesday, Thursday is named in honour of Thor, the god of thunder, while Friday was Frigg, the wife of Odin and goddess of love and beauty.

Over fragments of Roman calendars are extant, and they reveal both temporal and geographical variations in their format. This is true even though only the first 6 of 12 books, 1 for each month of the year of his Fasti, a poetic calendar describing festivals and the legends, are extant.

As Plutarch explained above, the Roman calendar was originally based upon lunar, not solar calculations, and an "intercalary month", amongst other fine tunings, was needed to remedy the difference, and keep the calendar consistent with the seasons.

For reasons which are not entirely clear, this was not always done, and consequently, by the time of Julius Caesar in the 1st Cen. BCE, the calendar was, bluntly, a mess.The Word Origin Day-to-Day Calendar: words, cliches, expressions, and brand names [Gregory McNamee] on schwenkreis.com *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

Learn the noteworthy roots behind words and phrases such as Skype, back to square one, woodchuck, motley crew, IKEA. The Calendar Act of reformed the English calendar so that a new year begun on 1 January, rather than 25 March.

This resulted in only having days, running from 25 March to 31 December. Chinese Calendar: Chinese also started using a lunisolar calendar with months beginning on the day of the new moon.

Years contain 12 or 13 such months, with the number of months determined by the number of new moons between successive winter solstices. By the s, the seemingly minor glitch of calculating the solar year to be 11 minutes and 14 seconds shorter than it is led to about a 10 day gap between the calendar and the real solar year.

An awakened being, a profound mystic and a contemporary master, Anandmurti Gurumaa is an exquisite synthesis of love and wisdom. Out of sheer compassion she has been bestowing upon people the greatest gift ever viz. guiding them from dark bondages of ignorance to the effulgence of liberating wisdom.

Perfecting a method of foretelling and predicting the passage of time preoccupied our ancestors from the earliest recorded history. The unending journey of the Sun, Moon and stars across the great expanse of the sky provides clues for numerous methods of marking time, the most obvious to primitive.

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