An interpretation of the us federal laws regarding the partial birth abortion

Abortion The abortion debate most commonly relates to the "induced abortion" of an embryo or fetus at some point in a pregnancy, which is also how the term is used in a legal sense. In medical parlance, "abortion" can refer to either miscarriage or abortion until the fetus is viable.

An interpretation of the us federal laws regarding the partial birth abortion

Respect Life Program Decisions of the U. Supreme Court rarely attract much public interest. One news cycle and a few days' discussion in the op-ed section is probably the norm for even the most important and sweeping decisions.

The average person probably has to cast back to a high school history course to recall the names of even a few landmark cases other than Miranda v. Arizona known mainly from the scripts of popular police shows.

But one Supreme Court decision eclipses all others in the past century. Far from being forgotten, in the thirty years since Roe v. Wade announced that the "constitutional" right to privacy encompasses a woman's decision to abort her child, its fame or infamy just keeps growing.

An interpretation of the us federal laws regarding the partial birth abortion

How Roe is Perceived For many Americans, Roe is a symptom of and catalyst for a continuing decline in American culture and institutions. It represents a tragic failure of the government, an abdication of its duty to defend the vulnerable and innocent.

The judicially-created regime permitting abortion on request throughout pregnancy has eroded principles on which this nation was founded — the sanctity of life, the equal dignity of all, and impartial justice.

Even the fundamental principle of self-government is shaken when seven unelected judges can overturn the will of the people expressed in the laws of 50 states. And how does one begin to assess the meaning and impact of destroying over 40 million children?

Many other Americans, less attuned to public policy matters, hold a very different view of Roe v. They see Roe as being immutable, permanent, "settled law. In thirty years, the Roe abortion license has been elevated by some to the stature of "freedom of speech," "trial by jury" and other bedrock American principles.

It is not surprising that many people share this distorted view of Roe v. For thirty years, the abortion industry has refined and perfected this message. Advocates like Planned Parenthood's president, Gloria Feldt, proclaim with no apparent irony: Any event or policy affecting a child before or near birth is minutely scrutinized for its potential to "undermine Roe v.

For example, state laws which punish violent attacks on unborn children and their mothers are denounced as schemes "designed to chip away at the constitutional rights of women. Senate filibusters are being used to block confirmation votes on nominees. Individuals who have received the American Bar Association's highest recommendation based on their knowledge of law, their integrity and judicial temperament are blocked chiefly because abortion lobbyists suspect they are not sufficiently deferential to Roe v.

Already two presidential candidates seeking election in have announced that, if elected, they would appoint no one to the Supreme Court "if they don't commit to supporting Roe v.

Wade and a woman's right to choose. They strain to explain why their position does not constitute a single issue "litmus test" for judicial appointees: Many Americans, including members of Congress, believe or act as if Roe v.

Wade and the U. Constitution have equal authority. They are wrong, both as to Roe's place in American constitutional law and as to the duty of citizens and judges to follow it unquestioningly. Few decisions in the history of the Supreme Court have cried out so loudly for reversal, on both moral and legal grounds.

And rarely has any decision been so fraught with conspicuous errors of law, fact and reasoning as the majority opinion in Roe. This article is addressed to all who may think that Roe deserves a measure of deference as a landmark of constitutional law notwithstanding its immoral outcome.

Legally speaking, Roe is an abomination, and an embarrassment to lawyers and public officials who feel compelled to defend it. Among the legal scholars who have roundly criticized the Court's ruling in Roe as not being grounded in the U.

Constitution are the following: Six justices of the U. Supreme Court, unfortunately not simultaneously seated — White, Rehnquist, Scalia, Thomas, Kennedy3 and O'Connor4; Virtually every recognized constitutional scholar who has published a book or article on Roe — including many, like Harvard's Laurence Tribe, who support Roe's outcome on other grounds although he's switched grounds over the years.

Wade "is bad because it is bad constitutional law, or rather because it is not constitutional law and gives almost no sense of an obligation to try to be";6 and Edward Lazarus, a former law clerk to Roe's author, Justice Harry Blackmun, who writes: As a matter of constitutional interpretation and judicial method, Roe borders on the indefensible.

I say this as someone utterly committed to the right to choose, as someone who believes such a right has grounding elsewhere in the Constitution instead of where Roe placed it, and as someone who loved Roe's author like a grandfather.

What, exactly, is the problem with Roe?The father, if married to the mother at the time she receives a partial-birth abortion procedure, and if the mother has not attained the age of 18 years at the time of the abortion, the maternal grandparents of the fetus, may in a civil action obtain appropriate relief, unless the pregnancy resulted.

This is a discussion of the various abuses of power which have been exhibited by the US government, often under the guise of 'fighting terrorism' or some other popular goal. Includes news articles about the abuse of power and the perpetuation of government agencies which have too much power, too little restraint, and too many bad ideas.

Partial-birth abortion appears to be the official legal term, however, since that is the term used in almost all state laws and by Congress. The Partial-Birth Abortion War 3, days have passed since the partial-birth abortion ban was upheld.

Birdsong has a question for all you Constitutional Law students out there — how much do you know about the Abstention Doctrine? If the answer is you never heard of it. You had better read some of the following Birdsong article before you take your Con Law final exam! Here is the article: COMITY AND OUR FEDERALISM IN THE TWENTY FIRST CENTURY: THE ABSTENTION DOCTRINES WILL ALWAYS BE WITH US.

Having a state law in place is necessary to provide for enforcement at the state level, instead of having to rely on federal prosecutors, whose resources are overextended. Background In the partial-birth abortion procedure, the woman’s cervix is dilated over a period of three days.

Human Reproduction - Child Birth Pre-Natal Care - Child Development - Giving Birth Toxins (poisons) Obstetrics is the field of study concentrated on pregnancy, Childbirth, and the postpartum schwenkreis.com a medical specialty, obstetrics is combined with gynaecology under the discipline known as obstetrics and gynaecology (OB/GYN).

Partial-Birth Abortion Ban Act